Short Description

Direct financial activities, such as planning, procurement, and investments for all or part of an organization.

 

Wages & Employment Trends

  1. Median wages (2006) $43.74 hourly
  2. Employment (2006) 506,000 employees
  3. Projected growth (2006-2016) Average (7% to 13%)
  4. Projected need (2006-2016) 138,000 additional employees

 

Relations

Controller, Treasurer, Business Manager, Finance Director, Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Finance Vice President, Business Administrator, Chief Fiscal Officer (CFO)

 

Tasks

  1. Prepare and file annual tax returns, or prepare financial information so that outside accountants can complete tax returns.
  2. Prepare or direct preparation of financial statements, business activity reports, financial position forecasts, annual budgets, and/or reports required by regulatory agencies.
  3. Supervise employees performing financial reporting, accounting, billing, collections, payroll, and budgeting duties.
  4. Delegate authority for the receipt, disbursement, banking, protection, and custody of funds, securities, and financial instruments.
  5. Maintain current knowledge of organizational policies and procedures, federal and state policies and directives, and current accounting standards.
  6. Conduct or coordinate audits of company accounts and financial transactions to ensure compliance with state and federal requirements and statutes.
  7. Receive and record requests for disbursements; authorize disbursements in accordance with policies and procedures.
  8. Monitor financial activities and details such as reserve levels to ensure that all legal and regulatory requirements are met.
  9. Monitor and evaluate the performance of accounting and other financial staff; recommend and implement personnel actions such as promotions and dismissals.
  10. Develop and maintain relationships with banking, insurance, and non-organizational accounting personnel in order to facilitate financial activities.

 

Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

  1. Desktop computers
  2. Notebook computers
  3. Personal computers
  4. Personal digital assistant PDAs or organizers
  5. Networking (LAN & WAN)
  6. Tablet computers

 

Technology used in this occupation

  1. Accounting software — Intuit QuickBooks; Job costing software; Sage Fixed Asset Solution FAS; Sage MIP Fund Accounting
  2. Data base user interface and query software — Database software; Microsoft Access; Oracle software; Structured query language SQL
  3. Enterprise resource planning ERP software — Microsoft Great Plains; Oracle PeopleSoft; SAP software; Solomon Software
  4. Financial analysis software — FRx software; Hyperion Pillar software; Oracle Financials
  5. Spreadsheet software — Corel QuattroPro; IBM Lotus 1-2-3; Microsoft Excel

 

Knowledge

  1. English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  2. Economics and Accounting — Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
  3. Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  4. Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  5. Law and Government — Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  6. Personnel and Human Resources — Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
  7. Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  8. Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

 

Skills

  1. Management of Financial Resources — Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
  2. Mathematics — Using mathematics to solve problems.
  3. Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  4. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  5. Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  6. Time Management — Managing one’s own time and the time of others.
  7. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  8. Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  9. Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  10. Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

 

Abilities

  1. Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  2. Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  3. Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  4. Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  5. Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  6. Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  7. Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  8. Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  9. Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  10. Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).

 

Work Activities

  1. Interacting With Computers — Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  2. Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  3. Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  4. Analyzing Data or Information — Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  5. Monitoring and Controlling Resources — Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
  6. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  7. Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  8. Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  9. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  10. Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards — Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

 

Work Context

  1. Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?
  2. Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
  3. Electronic Mail — How often do you use electronic mail in this job?
  4. Contact With Others — How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it?
  5. Frequency of Decision Making — How frequently is the worker required to make decisions that affect other people, the financial resources, and/or the image and reputation of the organization?
  6. Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — How do the decisions an employee makes impact the results of co-workers, clients or the company?
  7. Letters and Memos — How often does the job require written letters and memos?
  8. Spend Time Sitting — How much does this job require sitting?
  9. Structured versus Unstructured Work — To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals?
  10. Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?

 

Job Zone

Extensive Preparation Needed

  1. Overall Experience Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
  2. Job Training Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.
  3. Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve coordinating, training, supervising, or managing the activities of others to accomplish goals. Very advanced communication and organizational skills are required. Examples include librarians, lawyers, aerospace engineers, physicists, school psychologists, and surgeons.
  4. SVP Range (8.0 and above)

 

Education

A bachelor’s degree is the minimum formal education required for these occupations. However, many also require graduate school. For example, they may require a master’s degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

 

Interests

  1. Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  2. Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas.
  3. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

 

Work Styles

  1. Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  2. Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  3. Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  4. Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  5. Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  6. Independence — Job requires developing one’s own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  7. Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  8. Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  9. Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  10. Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

 

Work Values

  1. Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment.
  2. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
  3. Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
  4. Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

 

Other Occupation Details:

  1. Chief Executive
  2. Financial Examiner
  3. Financial Manager
  4. Purchasing Manager
  5. Accountant
  6. Auditor
  7. Tax Examiner
  8. Personal Finance Advisors
  9. Bookkeeper
  10. Budget Analyst
  11. Financial Analyst
  12. Credit Analyst
  13. Supervisor
  14. Loan Officer
  15. Bill Account Controller
  16. Administrative Officer
  17. Purchasing
  18. Cost Estimator
  19. Tax Preparer
  20. Clerk – Junior Accountant
  21. Clerk – Statement
  22. Teller
  23. Cashier