Short Description

Analyze financial information and prepare financial reports to determine or maintain record of assets, liabilities, profit and loss, tax liability, or other financial activities within an organization.

 

Wages & Employment Trends

  1. Median wages (2006) $26.26 hourly, $54,630 annual
  2. Employment (2006) 1,274,000 employees
  3. Projected growth (2006-2016) Faster than average (14% to 20%)
  4. Projected need (2006-2016) 450,000 additional employees

 

Relations

Staff Accountant, Certified Public Accountant (CPA), General Accountant, Accounting Manager, Business Analyst, Cost Accountant.

 

Tasks

  1. Prepare, examine, or analyze accounting records, financial statements, or other financial reports to assess accuracy, completeness, and conformance to reporting and procedural standards.
  2. Compute taxes owed and prepare tax returns, ensuring compliance with payment, reporting or other tax requirements.
  3. Analyze business operations, trends, costs, revenues, financial commitments, and obligations, to project future revenues and expenses or to provide advice.
  4. Report to management regarding the finances of establishment.
  5. Establish tables of accounts and assign entries to proper accounts.
  6. Develop, maintain, and analyze budgets, preparing periodic reports that compare budgeted costs to actual costs.
  7. Develop, implement, modify, and document recordkeeping and accounting systems, making use of current computer technology.
  8. Prepare forms and manuals for accounting and bookkeeping personnel, and direct their work activities.
  9. Survey operations to ascertain accounting needs and to recommend, develop, or maintain solutions to business and financial problems.
  10. Advise management about issues such as resource utilization, tax strategies, and the assumptions underlying budget forecasts.

 

Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

  1. Desktop computers
  2. Notebook computers
  3. Personal computers
  4. Personal digital assistant PDAs or organizers — Personal digital assistants PDA
  5. Tablet computers

Technology used in this occupation:

  1. Accounting software — Best MIP Fund Accounting; Intuit QuickBooks; Sage CPAClient Checkbook; Sage CPAPractice Manager
  2. Compliance software — ACCUCert software; Intrax ProcedureNet; Paisley Cardmap; Tax compliance property tax management software
  3. Enterprise resource planning ERP software — AcornSystems Corporate Performance Management; Microsoft Great Plains Solomon; Practice management software PMS; Sage Software Platinum for Windows PFW
  4. Financial analysis software — AuditWare software; Cartesis Magnitude iAnalysis; Fixed-assets depreciation software; MethodWare ProAudit Advisor
  5. Tax preparation software — CCH ProSystem fx TAX; Sync Essentials Trade Accountant; Thomson GoSystem Tax; Universal Tax Systems TaxWise.

 

Knowledge

  1. Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  2. Economics and Accounting — Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
  3. Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  4. English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  5. Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  6. Law and Government — Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  7. Clerical — Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  8. Personnel and Human Resources — Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.

 

Skills

  1. Mathematics — Using mathematics to solve problems.
  2. Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  3. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  4. Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  5. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  6. Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  7. Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  8. Systems Analysis — Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  9. Systems Evaluation — Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  10. Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions.

 

Abilities

  1. Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  2. Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  3. Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  4. Mathematical Reasoning — The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  5. Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  6. Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  7. Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  8. Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  9. Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  10. Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.

 

Work Activities

  1. Interacting With Computers — Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
  2. Analyzing Data or Information — Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  3. Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  4. Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  5. Documenting/Recording Information — Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  6. Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  7. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  8. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  9. Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  10. Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others — Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

 

Work Context

  1. Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?
  2. Electronic Mail — How often do you use electronic mail in this job?
  3. Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions?
  4. Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
  5. Structured versus Unstructured Work — To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals?
  6. Spend Time Sitting — How much does this job require sitting?
  7. Freedom to Make Decisions — How much decision making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer?
  8. Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?
  9. Work With Work Group or Team — How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job?
  10. Letters and Memos — How often does the job require written letters and memos?

 

Job Zone

Considerable Preparation Needed

  1. Overall Experience A minimum of two to four years of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.
  2. Job Training Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  3. Job Zone Examples Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, human resource managers, computer programmers, teachers, chemists, and police detectives.
  4. SVP Range (7.0 to < 8.0).

 

Education

Most of these occupations require a four – year bachelor’s degree, but some do not.

 

Interests

  1. Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  2. Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

 

Work Styles

  1. Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  2. Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  3. Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  4. Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  5. Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  6. Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  7. Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  8. Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  9. Independence — Job requires developing one’s own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  10. Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

 

Work Values

  1. Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
  2. Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

 

Other Occupation Details:

  1. Controller/Treasurer
  2. Chief Executive
  3. Financial Examiner
  4. Financial Manager
  5. Purchasing Manager
  6. Auditor
  7. Tax Examiner
  8. Personal Finance Advisors
  9. Bookkeeper
  10. Budget Analyst
  11. Financial Analyst
  12. Credit Analyst
  13. Supervisor
  14. Loan Officer
  15. Bill Account Controller
  16. Administrative Officer
  17. Purchasing
  18. Cost Estimator
  19. Tax Preparer
  20. Clerk – Junior Accountant
  21. Clerk – Statement
  22. Teller
  23. Cashier